TTIMES WORLD: Health News Report

Friday, January 19, 2018
Washington, DC, USA


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CHOLERA - Rare Water Borne Disease
How To Treat

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Cholera, caused by the bacteria Vibrio cholerae, is rare in the United States and other industrialized nations. However, globally, cholera cases have increased steadily since 2005 and the disease still occurs in many places including Africa, Southeast Asia, and Haiti. CDC responds to cholera outbreaks across the world using its Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) expertise.

Cholera can be life-threatening but it is easily prevented and treated. Travelers, public health and medical professionals and outbreak responders should be aware of areas with high rates of cholera, know how the disease spreads, and what to do to prevent it.

Cholera is an acute, diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. An estimated 3-5 million cases and over 100,000 deaths occur each year around the world. The infection is often mild or without symptoms, but can sometimes be severe. Approximately one in 10 (5-10%) infected persons will have severe disease characterized by profuse watery diarrhea, vomiting, and leg cramps. In these people, rapid loss of body fluids leads to dehydration and shock. Without treatment, death can occur within hours.

TREATMENT:
•Rehydration therapy, meaning prompt restoration of lost fluids and salts through rehydration therapy is the primary goal of treatment.
•Antibiotic treatment, which reduces fluid requirements and duration of illness, is indicated for severe cases of cholera.
•Zinc treatment has also been shown to help improve cholera symptoms in children.

Vitamin C What It Does For The Body
What Its Defeciency Can Cause

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Vitamin C plays a role in many vital functions in the body, including growth, maintenance, and repair of tissues like the skin, joints, blood vessels, bones, and teeth. It is critically important in wound healing and is also a powerful antioxidant.

Its antioxidant ability, or the ability to protect cells from free radicals, is the basis for all the hype about getting your vitamin C. Free radicals are created by exposure to environmental toxins like tobacco, heavy metals, and radiation, and are even released during normal cell metabolism. Free radicals bombard healthy cells and can leave them (and their DNA) damaged, leading to sickness and disease. Antioxidants like vitamin C protect cells against cancer, heart disease, and arthritis by neutralizing free radicals in the body.

Severe vitamin C deficiency is called scurvy. Symptoms of scurvy include bruising, bleeding under the skin, poor wound healing, hair loss, tooth loss, swelling, joint pain, nosebleeds, anemia and eventually death, if the deficiency is not corrected. Today scurvy is rare because it takes such a small amount of vitamin C to prevent it. However, it is still present in some undernourished parts of the world.

Russians Women IT Geek Squad
New Weapon in Cyber Warfare

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Russian Women Squad
IT Invasion and New Generation Hackers


Irina Khoroshko, from Zelenograd near Moscow, had learned her times tables by the age of five.

Her precocious talent, encouraged by a maths-mad family and a favourite female teacher who transformed every lesson into one giant problem-solving game, led to a degree in mathematical economics at Plekhanov Russian University of Economics.

"My lecturer instilled in me the power of numbers and calculation, how it gives you the ability to predict things; in that sense the subject always felt magical," she says.

Now Irina, 26, is a data scientist at Russian online lender, ID Finance, enjoying a lucrative career devising analytical models to determine loan eligibility.

And this isn't an unusual story in Russia. But it is in many other countries around the world.

Several studies confirm that all too often girls' early interest in Stem subjects - science, technology, engineering and maths - fizzles out and never recovers.

So relatively few women go on to choose engineering or technology as a career. Why?

A new study from Microsoft sheds some light.

Based on interviews with 11,500 girls and young women across Europe, it finds their interest in these subjects drops dramatically at 15, with gender stereotypes, few female role models, peer pressure and a lack of encouragement from parents and teachers largely to blame.

Not so in Russia.

4 Main Areas of your Body
Mostly Affected by Diabetes

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Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which inadequate production of the hormone insulin or a resistance to its actions in the body can lead to high blood sugar levels. Insulin is needed to get sugar into cells of the body, where it is used for energy. When sugar cannot get into cells, it remains in the blood at high levels. Complications of diabetes arise from long-term exposure to high blood sugar. The cardiovascular, nervous, visual and urinary systems are most commonly affected by chronically high blood sugars.

1. Heart and Blood Vessels

The cardiovascular system includes the heart and blood vessels. High blood sugar and increased blood fat levels commonly found in people with diabetes contribute to fatty deposits called plaques on the inner walls of blood vessels, causing inflammation. This leads to decreased blood flow and hardening of the blood vessels called atherosclerosis. High blood sugar also results in glycation, where sugars attach to proteins, making them sticky. This occurs on proteins found in blood vessels, also resulting in inflammation. When this occurs in the heart, it can lead to cardiovascular disease. According to a 2016 report from the American Heart Association, 68 percent of people with diabetes older than 65 die of heart disease.
Nervous System

2. Brain and Nerve damage:

Popularly called diabetic neuropathy, this damage is common in people with diabetes. Symptoms typically appear after several years but may be present when diabetes is diagnosed, as the disease may have gone undetected for many years. Diabetic nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. According to a 2005 statement by the American Diabetes Association, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. This typically starts as numbness or tingling that progresses to loss of pain and heat and cold perception in feet or hands, making it difficult to sense an injury. Another type of nerve damage called diabetic autonomic neuropathy affects nerves regulating the heart, blood vessels, and digestive and other systems. This condition can lead to problems with blood pressure, heart rhythm and digestion, among others.

3. Eye

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in 2005 to 2008, 28.5 percent of adults with diabetes 40 years or older had diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease is caused by high blood sugar levels leading to blood vessel damage and fluid leakage in the vision-sensing part of the eye called the retina. Diabetic macular edema is a complication of diabetic retinopathy wherein the center of the retina, which is responsible for detailed vision, is affected. These conditions can eventually lead to blindness. High blood sugar can also lead to an increased risk of cataracts and glaucoma. These eye disorders occur earlier and more often in people with diabetes, compared to those without the disease.


4. Kidney and the Urinary System

In 2011, CDC reported that diabetes was the primary cause of kidney failure in 44 percent of people newly diagnosed with the condition. High levels of blood sugar can damage the kidneys. The result is an illness known as diabetic nephropathy that can eventually lead to kidney failure. High blood sugar levels initially damage the blood vessels in the kidneys. As diabetic nephropathy progresses, there is thickening of kidney tissue and scarring. When the kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter the blood properly. This results in waste and fluid buildup in the blood, and leakage of important blood proteins into the urine.

Victoria Becham - Eyes on the Mark
Setting Target Goals

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Victoria Becham To Star in More Movies
After Huge Success in Animated Box Office Hit


Victoria Becham's dream of making it onto the silver screen looks set to become a firm reality. after Starring in Madagascar 3. She is set to appear in the newest installment of a new box office.

The Madagascar which followed the main character, Alex the Lion (voiced by Ben Stiller) and pals (David Schwimmer, Chris Rock) as they travel through Europe in an attempt to make it home to their zoo in New York, has given the Becham an open door to her dreams. Beckham’s character has yet to be revealed but it’s expected that she’ll be able to bring plenty of her own personality to the role. Whats next for the keen eyed talent .....

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