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Thursday, October 21, 2021
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Just Another Thought at Mars Hill – “You” Take it and send that boy off to die.
Today at Mars Hill

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Just Another Thought at Mars Hill – “You” Take it and send that boy off to die.

They say it is the glory of the crown to conceal a matter but

The delight of the prudent to search them out.

Let's read this from Mars Hill today.

A great American poet and singer wrote in the late nineteen sixties song.

“Rockets, moon shots Spend it on the have nots
Money, we make it, before we see it "you" take it”

Is the money here really taken or it was given to the “you”.

Who is the “you” in this text today, the Professional Ball Club Owners, the Hedge Fund Managers, the Policeman, your Landlords, the Employers or even Uncle Sam through those technocrats or powerful interest groups?

The writer goes on to say,
“Bills pile up sky high
Send that boy off to die”

Are these factors beyond the boy’s control?  Do you find answers in getting back from the “you” or it should just be the way it is? Some will say No, it’s a capitalistic world, join the “You”, get what is your share. You have one life to live, learn the way of “you” as much as you can. Others say No, it is a Jungle out there. Do not give up an inch, fight like hell, be a winner, be smart, by all means necessary, hold the power or fight the powers that be till you have all the ground.

No chance cries the young man and off he goes to die.

Just another thought today at Mars Hill

 

By Guy Bentley

Send us your comments and answers on this blog or email cs@advanceQT.com Email to a friend and try to find an answer.

Brain, Eye and Nerve Damage
In Diabetic Patients

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Brain, Eye and Nerve damage:

Popularly called diabetic neuropathy, this damage is common in people with diabetes. Symptoms typically appear after several years but may be present when diabetes is diagnosed, as the disease may have gone undetected for many years. Diabetic nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. According to a 2005 statement by the American Diabetes Association, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. This typically starts as numbness or tingling that progresses to loss of pain and heat and cold perception in feet or hands, making it difficult to sense an injury. Another type of nerve damage called diabetic autonomic neuropathy affects nerves regulating the heart, blood vessels, and digestive and other systems. This condition can lead to problems with blood pressure, heart rhythm and digestion, among others.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in 2005 to 2008, 28.5 percent of adults with diabetes 40 years or older had diabetic retinopathy. This eye disease is caused by high blood sugar levels leading to blood vessel damage and fluid leakage in the vision-sensing part of the eye called the retina. Diabetic macular edema is a complication of diabetic retinopathy wherein the center of the retina, which is responsible for detailed vision, is affected. These conditions can eventually lead to blindness. High blood sugar can also lead to an increased risk of cataracts and glaucoma. These eye disorders occur earlier and more often in people with diabetes, compared to those without the disease.

Making Brain Connections and Business
Success is a Few Principles Away

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If we simply pay closer attention to the emails, phone calls, and online interactions that make up our days, we can in turn create solid relationships with colleagues and clients alike.

Read on for her tips on how you can make more meaningful connections in the coming months:

Improve your social networking skills.

In today's business world, social networking can't be ignored. We promote products on Facebook, network through LinkedIn, and get our news updates via tweets on Twitter. And while social networking is a great way to connect, it can be easy to forget that what you are aiming for are meaningful connections. And making meaningful connections via social media can sometimes take a little extra work and a different approach. Kuzmeski says that using a few simple rules of thumb can help make your social networking more efficient.

"Just like your real-life relationships, you should be picky about who you make connections with online," she asserts. "Choose to connect with people who have similar interests or who are working in your particular field. And when someone you know, want to know, or need to know connects with you online, you should always reciprocate.

Remember: It's quality, not quantity.

While the connections you make through social media are important—especially when you can transform those connections into relationships—you have to be careful not to get caught up in a more, more, more mentality, where you are constantly striving to get more friends on Facebook or to tweet more often during your day.

What Are Head Injuries
How Should We Consider Them

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Head Injuries?
Head injuries are dangerous. They can lead to permanent disability, mental impairment, and even death. To most people, head injuries are considered an acceptable risk when engaging in sports and other types of recreational activities. But there are steps you can take to lower the risk and protect yourself and your children.

What Are Head Injuries?

Head injuries are injuries to the scalp, skull, or brain caused by trauma. Concussions are the most common type of sports-related brain injury with an estimated 1.6 million to 3.8 million sports-related concussions a year. A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that happens when the brain is jarred or shaken hard enough to bounce against the skull. This can happen when two athletes collide or when someone falls and hits his or her head. It can also result from being hit in the head with a piece of sporting equipment. In a sport such as soccer, even "heading" the ball can cause a concussion. A concussion causes an alteration of a person's mental status and can disrupt the normal functioning of the brain. Multiple concussions can have a long-lasting, cumulative life-changing effect.

You don't have to be hit in the head to experience a concussion. An impact elsewhere on the body can create enough force to jar the brain. You also won't necessarily lose consciousness with a concussion. Concussions range from mild to severe. The effects may be apparent immediately, or they may not show up until hours or even days later.

Other types of TBIs are a contusion, which is a bruise on the brain that can cause swelling, and a hematoma, which is bleeding in the brain that collects and forms a clot. A skull fracture is another type of head injury that can affect the brain. Sometimes with a fracture, pieces of bone can cut into the brain and cause bleeding and other types of injury.

Latest 5 Treatment Options - Brain Tumors
The Research and Treatment of Brain Tumor

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1. Immunotherapy. Immunotherapy, also called biological response modifier (BRM) therapy, is designed to boost the body's natural defenses to fight the cancer. It uses materials either made by the body or in a laboratory to improve, target, or restore immune system function. Different methods are being studied for brain tumors, such as the use of dendritic cells or the use of vaccines aimed against a specific molecule on the surface of the tumor cells. Several methods are currently being tested in clinical trials.

2. Oncolytic virus therapy. This therapy uses a virus that infects and destroys tumor cells, sparing healthy brain cells. It is currently being researched as a treatment for brain tumors.

3. Targeted therapy. As outlined in Treatment Options, this type of treatment targets faulty genes or proteins that contribute to a tumor’s growth and development. Research continues on the use of therapies for brain tumors that target the different ways a tumor grows, how a tumor spreads, and how tumor cells die.

4. Blood-brain barrier disruption. This technique temporarily disrupts the brain’s natural protective barrier in order to allow chemotherapy to more easily enter the brain from the bloodstream.
New drugs and combinations of drugs. Researchers are looking at using drugs currently used for other types of cancer as treatment for a brain tumor. In addition, combinations of drugs that target different pathways a tumor uses to grow and spread are being explored. Since tumors can develop resistance to chemotherapy, meaning the treatment stops working, another approach is to use a treatment that targets how tumor cells develop resistance.

5. Gene therapy. This type of therapy seeks to replace or repair abnormal genes that are causing or helping tumor growth

Risk Factor For Skin Cancer
Things You Need to Know Before Summer Exposure

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Risk factors
Exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet light is a risk factor for all types of skin cancer.6
Avoiding this risk factor alone could prevent more than 5 million cases of skin cancer every year.6
Research indicates that UV light from the sun and tanning beds can both cause melanoma and increase the risk of a benign mole progressing to melanoma.16
Increasing intermittent sun exposure in childhood and during one’s lifetime is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and melanoma.17
Even one blistering sunburn during childhood or adolescence can nearly double a person's chance of developing melanoma.18
Experiencing five or more blistering sunburns between ages 15 and 20 increases one’s melanoma risk by 80 percent and nonmelanoma skin cancer risk by 68 percent.19
In 2010, new research found that daily sunscreen use cut the incidence of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, in half.20
People older than 65 may experience melanoma more frequently because of UV exposure they've received over the course of their lives.21
Higher melanoma rates among men may be due in part to lower rates of sun protection. 1,22
Exposure to tanning beds increases the risk of melanoma, especially in women 45 and younger.23-24
Researchers estimate that indoor tanning may cause upwards of 400,000 cases of skin cancer in the U.S. each year.25-26
In females 15 to 29 years old, the torso/trunk is the most common location for developing melanoma, which may be due to high-risk tanning behaviors.27
Higher melanoma rates among young females compared to young males may be due in part to widespread use of indoor tanning among females.1
Risk factors for all types of skin cancer include skin that burns easily; blond or red hair; a history of excessive sun exposure, including sunburns; tanning bed use; immune system-suppressing diseases or treatments; and a history of skin cancer.6
People with more than 50 moles, atypical moles, or large moles are at an increased risk of developing melanoma, as are those with light skin and freckles, and those with a personal or family history of melanoma.6, 28
Melanoma survivors have an approximately nine-fold increased risk of developing another melanoma compared to the general population.29
Men and women with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing melanoma than people without a nonmelanoma skin cancer history.30
Women with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing leukemia, breast, kidney and lung cancers, and men with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing prostate cancer. 30
Prevention and detection
Because exposure to UV light is the most preventable risk factor for all skin cancers,6 the American Academy of Dermatology encourages everyone to protect their skin from the sun’s harmful UV rays by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing and using a sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of 30 or higher.
Because severe sunburns during childhood may increase one’s risk of melanoma, children should be especially protected from the sun.6
People should not use tanning beds or sun lamps, which are sources of artificial UV radiation that may cause skin cancer.
Skin cancer warning signs include changes in size, shape or color of a mole or other skin lesion, the appearance of a new growth on the skin, or a sore that doesn't heal. If you notice any spots on your skin that are different from the others, or anything changing, itching or bleeding, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that you make an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist.
The American Academy of Dermatology encourages everyone to perform skin self-exams to check for signs of skin cancer and get a skin exam from a doctor. A dermatologist can make individual recommendations as to how often a person needs these exams based on risk factors, including skin type, history of sun exposure and family history.
Individuals with a history of melanoma should have a full-body exam by a board-certified dermatologist at least annually and perform regular self-exams to check for new and changing moles.31

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