TTIMES WORLD: Today's News Report

Thursday, October 21, 2021
Washington, DC, USA


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Weight Loss Goals
How To Make Progress

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Stimulate Your Weight Loss Process

Millions of people suffer from obesity and the many health problems associated it. They have tried numerous diets and weight loss programs, but the results are disappointing. If your weight interferes with your everyday activities and relationships, it's high time to try an individualized approach that may include nutrition, physical activity, behavior change, or medications. An innovative diagnosis and treatment options that may treat for a range of disorders which may be also be responsible for your  increased weight.



Successful Approaches to Enhance Weight Loss Process will Include the Following:

  • Decrease your appetite

  • Increase your metabolism

  • Stop cravings and hunger pangs

  • Balance mineral and vitamin deficiencies

Energy Boosting Injectables – To enhance weight loss and at the same time helps your body adjust, a set of injections may be recommended:

  • Vitamin B12 to increase energy level

  • Lipotropic shots for burning fat

  • Energizer shots for weight loss plateaus

Holistic Treatments = Long Lasting Results

The one secret to long-lasting results of weight loss is to keep a balance of your hormones. Weight gain is the result of imbalance caused by hormones and nutrients. In order to restore and keep a balance of your hormones, adopt these three strategies:

  • Improve Vigor

  • Increase Energy

  • Maintain Weight Loss


You Need choice to select best and most available doctors. Set up an account with any online Provider  search group, and find best weight loss medical groups in your area , Like Zoc Doc, Web MD or create a Cloud Medical Account on Healthcare800, so you can connect with the best most available doctors easily online, and keep your permanent medical account of all services with any care you receive for your health!


International Men and Gender Equality Survey
Pakistan

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The International Men and Gender Equality Survey – Pakistan (PAK-IMAGES) combines quantitative and qualitative data with a literature review on gender-based violence. The survey incorporates male and female participants, aged 18-49, from four provinces in Pakistan: Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, and Sindh. This is the first formalized study which assesses men’s perception on a variety of topics pertaining to gender equality in Pakistan.

This countrywide study was coordinated by Rutgers, Rozan, and the Federal Ministry of Human Rights, Government of Pakistan with the financial support of Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (through Prevention+) and the Norwegian Church Aid (NCA). The Population Council, Pakistan carried out the research as the technical partner on the study.

What is Presbycusis
How Does This Affect Your Hearing

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Hearing Loss From Advancing Age:

Presbycusis is the loss of hearing that gradually occurs in most individuals as they grow older. Hearing loss is a common disorder associated with aging. About 30-35 percent of adults between the ages of 65 and 75 years have a hearing loss.

It is estimated that 40-50 percent of people 75 and older have a hearing loss. The loss associated with presbycusis is usually greater for high-pitched sounds. For example, it may be difficult for someone to hear the nearby chirping of a bird or the ringing of a telephone.

However, the same person may be able to clearly hear the low-pitched sound of a truck rumbling down the street. There are many causes of presbycusis. Most commonly, it arises from changes in the
inner ear of a person as he or she ages, but presbycusis can also result from complex changes along the nerve pathways leading to the brain. Presbycusis most often occurs in both ears, affecting them equally. Because the process of loss is gradual, people who
have presbycusis may not realize that their hearing is diminishing.

Sports Related Brain Injuries
Facts and Cases Reported

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Sports-Related Recurrent Brain Injuries

An estimated 300,000 sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) of mild to moderate severity (1), most of which can be classified as concussions (i.e., conditions of temporarily altered mental status as a result of head trauma), occur in the United States each year. The proportion of these concussions that are repeat injuries is unknown; however, there is an increased risk for subsequent TBI among persons who have had at least one previous TBI (2,3). Repeated mild brain injuries occurring over an extended period (i.e., months or years) can result in cumulative neurologic and cognitive deficits (4,5), but repeated mild brain injuries occurring within a short period (i.e., hours, days, or weeks) can be catastrophic or fatal. The latter phenomenon, termed "second impact syndrome," has been reported more frequently since it was first characterized in 1984 (6-8). This report describes two cases of second impact syndrome and presents recommendations developed by the American Academy of Neurology to prevent recurrent brain injuries in sports and their adverse consequences (9). Case Reports

Case 1. During October, a 17-year-old high school football player was tackled on the last play of the first half of a varsity game and struck his head on the ground. During halftime intermission, he told a teammate that he felt ill and had a headache; he did not tell his coach. He played again during the third quarter and received several routine blows to his helmet during blocks and tackles. He then collapsed on the field and was taken to a local hospital in a coma. A computed tomography (CT) brain scan revealed diffuse swelling of the brain and a small subdural hematoma. He was transferred to a regional trauma center, where attempts to reduce elevated intracranial pressure were unsuccessful, and he was pronounced brain dead 4 days later. Autopsy revealed diffuse brain swelling, focal areas of subcortical ischemia, and a small subdural hematoma.

Case 2. During August, a 19-year-old college football player reported headache to family members after a full-contact practice during summer training. During practice the following day, he collapsed on the field approximately 2 minutes after engaging in a tackle. He was transported to a nearby trauma center, where a CT scan of the head showed diffuse brain swelling and a thin subdural hematoma. Attempts to control the elevated intracranial pressure failed, and he was pronounced brain dead 3 days later. Autopsy revealed the brain to be diffusely swollen with evidence of cerebrovascular congestion and features of temporal lobe herniation.

Summary of Related Data

The true incidence of second impact syndrome is unknown. During 1984-1991, four cases were described, and during 12 months, a total of 17 cases were described; most cases have involved male adolescents or young adults and involved participation in boxing, football, ice hockey, and snow skiing (8). Combined data from four states (Colorado, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Utah) during indicated an annual rate of 2.6 cases per 100,000 population of sports-related TBI that resulted in hospitalization or death; the proportion attributable to second impact syndrome is unknown.

Sport and Injuries
What You Need To Know

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Statistics on Sports Injuries
You Need to Know Before your Children Participates in Any Sports


The top three reasons: adults, coaches and parents.
Among athletes ages 5 to 14, 28 percent of percent of football players,

25 percent of baseball players, 22 percent of soccer players, 15 percent of basketball players, and 12 percent of softball players were injured while playing their respective sports.

Study also found that 70 percent of athletes said they had practiced or played with an injury, compared with 33 percent of non-athletes. Forty percent of athletes were diagnosed with osteoarthritis after college, compared with 24 percent of non-athletes.

A 2007 study found that, in high school and college football, there are an average of 7.23 catastrophic head injuries per year: there were 0.67 injuries per 100,000 high school players and 0.21 injuries per 100,000 college players.

In the U.S., about 30 million children and teens participate in some form of organized sports, and more than 3.5 million injuries each year, which cause some loss of time of participation, are experienced by the participants. Almost one-third of all injuries incurred in childhood are sports-related injuries.

Drug Overdose Increasing
At an Alarming Rate in the US

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Cause of death of Americans under 50
Overdoses are now the leading cause of death of Americans under the age of 50.

According to preliminary data compiled by The New York Times, deaths last year likely topped 59,000 -- 19 percent more than the year before.
In Ohio, they were up even more.

On May 26, Cleveland Police Sgt. Timothy Maffo-Judd's body camera was running as he approached a man slumped in his car. It turned out that the man was minutes from a fatal drug overdose.

Three applications of Narcan -- the anti-overdose drug -- and the victim finally started coming around.

Maffo-Judd says it's become a grim routine, and he's even encountered the same person twice. "That's pretty common," he says.

There were 11 overdoses on Monday night alone in Cleveland -- two of them were fatal.

At least 4,100 people died from unintentional drug overdoses last year in Ohio-- a 36 percent increase from the past year.

Kentucky, West Virginia and New Hampshire have also experienced shocking increases, along with the East Coast.

Most of it is tied to heroin or prescription painkillers, often laced with a powerful synthetic opioid known as fentanyl.

In Ohio alone, nearly four billion opioid pills were prescribed across Ohio

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